Starmouse's rat breeding blog

starmouse

All in service of some implacable "just cause".
Artist
Screenshotter
Team Delta
Pokédex No.
200
Caught
Jun 30, 2019
Messages
109
Nature
Impish
Pronouns
she/her
Pokémon Type
Water, Fairy
Pokédex Entry
This Pokémon is said to be scared of its own shadow. It can often be found sitting in the rain.
Hello and welcome to my blog about breeding starmice rats! :no::no::no:

I thought I would start this first post with some FAQ type thing about breeding rats and breeding in general, since I know the whats and whys are something of a mystery to a lot of people, and there are a lot of very widely-perpetuated myths about breeding. Keep in mind, this will go into some slightly sensitive topics such as "feeder breeding", but I hope you will find it interesting if you choose to read it!


Science-based approach best approach!

Great question! (Thank you, me!)

Why breed rats in particular -- because they're lovely, funny, playful, very robust and simple to care for, and social! They're cute, to boot! I've kept pet rats for many years, and they are just really cool, awesome animals.

Why breed, period -- this has a bit of a complex answer. My main drive is to select for animals that have excellent temperament and health. Poorly-bred rats are prone to health problems like respiratory infections and tumours, and can be skittish or even aggressive. My goal is to work towards the opposite of that! Happier rats, and happier pet owners.

To preface this next part, I love all animals (except hippos). I also have a pet snake who does need to eat rats, so a secondary goal of mine is to breed humanely-raised "feeders" both for him and for other people's animals. A lot of our local feeder sources have really poor conditions, so I'd much rather breed feeders myself, as I know the rats are raised with love and care and humanely put to sleep when it's time to do so. (I do not sell live rats as food; only frozen.)

Many breeders also donate rats or other prey species to wildlife rehabilitation shelters that take in foxes, raptors, and other carnivorous animals.
(Other questions to be added as I think of them!)
It's a common sentiment that breeding is antithetical to animal rescue, and that breeders are filling up shelters with their animals. This isn't reeeally true, unless you're talking about backyard breeders. Ethical breeders screen adopters to ensure they will provide a good home for their animals, and maintain a relationship and follow up with said adopters to ensure the animals don't end up in a shelter! Often, breeders will take back animals that are no longer wanted, or will help rehome them. This means their animals will not contribute to shelter overflow problems.

For example, the breeder of my pet rabbit has adopters follow an agreement such that if you were to give up ownership of a rabbit produced by her, you can either bring the rabbit back to her, or she will work with you to find a suitable new adopter.

Good breeders also strive to breed well-adjusted, healthy animals. This means they are unlikely to have aggression or fear issues that could lead to the owner giving up on them, and are unlikely to rack up enormous vet bills that could do the same.

As for "adopt don't shop" as a policy -- while I think it's great to adopt animals, I also think people should be free to exercise choice in this regard, as shelter animals are often for more experienced homes and have an unknown history (for example, around small children). This is great if you are equipped for those things, but not everyone is. Particularly for rats, which don't live very long, and which you can't really spend years training and working with like you can with a dog.

While show and "designer dog" breeding is its own can of worms, and I can't really speak to that, hobbyist and pet rodent breeders almost never break even. I can't think of a single other rat breeder* I know who makes a profit. It's just not something you do for money. (I had, um, a very large bill recently when I sent in blood samples of my rats for disease testing.)

*excepting large-scale feeder breeders, but that's apples and oranges

No, actually! Well -- mostly no.

Quick glossary brush-up -- a "line" is an inbred or line-bred bloodline of animals. To "outcross" is to pair two animals that are completely unrelated. A "recessive" gene is a gene that needs two copies to be expressed. A "mutation" is a spontaneous change in a gene that was not present in either parent.

So, I'll talk specifically about rats to begin with -- because that's what I know the most about. Wild rats, as with many animal species, actually inbreed quite often, and studies show high rates of DNA similarity between rats in a specific area. Lab rats, as well, are inbred for quite a few generations in order to produce a predictable strain (a minimum of 20 generations is needed to consider the strain "inbred"). So how can this happen without creating terrifying blond sociopaths?

The reality is, genetic replication is pretty much indifferent to whether two parents are related or not. If two parents are related, this is only meaningful insofar as recessive genes are more likely to show up in pairs in their offspring, since both parents are more likely to have the same genes. But recessive genes are not usually bad -- they're responsible for causing such innocuous things as fur colour changes. There is no higher likelihood of actual mutations occurring in the offspring of related parents, and they will generally not come out "deformed" or anything like that.

The problem with inbreeding comes when the recessives code for something dangerous, like a genetic disease. However, there are processes to breed these out of the gene pool of a line, after which it would be extremely unlikely for them to return without an outcross (the only possibility being a random mutation occurring and producing exactly the same defect, which is exceptionally unlikely and totally unrelated to inbreeding). Thus, you can have a genetically homogeneous, and yet healthy, population of animals.

I should add that recessive genetic diseases are actually pretty uncommon, and I've yet to see one.

Inbreeding is also a safer bet in rats than in "slower" species, because rats have large litters and reproduce very quickly; thus, if there's (say) a 50% chance of inheriting a deleterious trait, that still means that on average, 6 rats in a litter of 12 won't have that trait, and 3 won't even carry it. At that point, it's just a matter of finding the ones that don't carry the trait, and boom, trait gone. Or, in the wild, a matter of natural selection doing its thing.

So inbreeding isn't actively harmful -- but it can be really beneficial, too. Outcrossing is kinda like playing Russian Roulette, which is to say, if you pair two totally unrelated rats, you have only a vague idea of what you're going to get. Outcrossing can be a useful thing in some circumstances, but when you inbreed, you form a line that you (with a reasonable degree of certainty, anyway) know. You know the line tends to throw litters of a certain size, you know the babies will be calm and interested in people, you know they won't have tumours, because none of their ancestors have had tumours in 20 years, etc. Moreover, inbreeding allows you to know if anything bad is lurking in the gene pool--which otherwise would bounce around quietly until it comes out in one big surprise.

(Secondary problems occur when animals are selected too hard for "designer" traits -- like brachycephalic dogs. This is a matter of being responsible and moderate, and never selecting for traits that will cause an animal to suffer.)


Phew! That took a while to type. If you have any questions about rat breeding that aren't answered up there, feel free throw them at me.
 
Last edited:

MouseWithADinosaurTail

Luck will travel, but that's why I've got feet
Artist
Writer
Team Omega
Pokédex No.
47
Caught
Jun 15, 2019
Messages
762
Location
Paniola Ranch
Nature
Quirky
Pronouns
She/Her
Pokémon Type
Fairy, Flying
Pokédex Entry
Though she often appears sweet and polite, the smell of wrong opinions may cause this pokemon to latch bite.
Oh my god. oh my gooooooood. this is the content I didn't know I needed but needed so much

Edited to add cause I realized I sohuld probably say more sdkjfhsgf: It's nice to see some positive content towards rat breeding, especially breeding for food! I'm glad it sounds like you have a very humane practice, and I expect that you treat your rats with a lot of love and care! I can't wait to see some baby rat photos. OwO
 

Bug

👉😎👉
Moderator
Tech Team
🌱Featurer
🎇Contributor
Artist
Screenshotter
Team Delta
Pokédex No.
1
Caught
May 13, 2019
Messages
636
Location
in a pile of bugs
Nature
Rash
Pronouns
he/him
Pokémon Type
Bug, Cute
Pokédex Entry
oh fuck oh shit my dots...............................................................................................................................
I saw this blog and rushed in with wild abandon. I LOVE your rat posts. And I'm very interested in how you do things, because working in a store that sells your standard feeders, well... Poor things aren't really well handled. Knowing there are alternatives and how they work will definitely help me in the long run at sticking a couple of middle fingers up at nasty breeding practices. So, thanks for sharing what you know with us!

I don't know a lot about rats due to a lack of exposure, so I hope to learn a lot and see some really cute ratties.
 

starmouse

All in service of some implacable "just cause".
Artist
Screenshotter
Team Delta
Pokédex No.
200
Caught
Jun 30, 2019
Messages
109
Nature
Impish
Pronouns
she/her
Pokémon Type
Water, Fairy
Pokédex Entry
This Pokémon is said to be scared of its own shadow. It can often be found sitting in the rain.
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #4
@MouseWithADinosaurTail
@Bug

Aaah thank you both of you for your super nice comments!:squiddle: gfkgl;gv I'm really happy other people enjoy this stuff too!!!
I was worried a bit about posting about feeder breeding but I'm more than happy to talk about ethical practice and such as that's a big big sticking point of mine!

Mouse -- I am dying to take some more baby rat photos, but I'm on a breeding hold right now while I wait for some lab results to come in. Which I might make a post about, come to think of it.
 

sugar heart

nono morikubo is a qt
Screenshotter
Team Delta
Pokédex No.
257
Caught
Jul 1, 2019
Messages
157
Location
346 pro
Nature
Quirky
Pronouns
she/they
Pokémon Type
Fairy, Normal
Pokédex Entry
hello, i like idols.
this is the kind of content that i live for

i never knew we needed a rat-breeding thread on nuzforums until you came along, this is beautiful
 

Zorua3

On-and-off Nuzlocker
Artist
Team Omega
Pokédex No.
387
Caught
Jul 5, 2019
Messages
160
Location
Somewhere in Unova.
Nature
Quirky
Pronouns
He/him
Pokémon Type
Dark
Pokédex Entry
I'd copy-paste the Zorua Pokedex entry, but I'm too lazy.
What everyone else said. Came for the Nuzlockes, stayed for the rat breeding.
 

starmouse

All in service of some implacable "just cause".
Artist
Screenshotter
Team Delta
Pokédex No.
200
Caught
Jun 30, 2019
Messages
109
Nature
Impish
Pronouns
she/her
Pokémon Type
Water, Fairy
Pokédex Entry
This Pokémon is said to be scared of its own shadow. It can often be found sitting in the rain.
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
Gosh, I'm blushing here! Thank you @sugar heart @Zorua3 for your kind feedback!

I've written another entry below with some information about a very special kind of rat.

For today's post, I've decided to go back in time... to the very beginning.

To PINKIES!

Featured, one of my rat litters. Click thumbnail for high-res version.
Quoth my dad after seeing my rats' first litter: "I thought you'd get, like, three babies, and they'd look like rats. Instead you got 13 and they look like they came from space!"


"Pinkies" (singular "pinkie" or "pink") is an affectionate nickname for the tiny, pink newborn babies of rats and mice. The pinkie may also be known as a "bean", although older baby rats with fur are also considered "beans".

So why are they pink?

You see, most rodents adopt a strategy called "altriciality". "Altriciality" refers to a state of helplessness at birth, as compared to an animal like a horse that's up and running right after it's born (this is called "precociality"). Other animals that are born altricial include cats, dogs, and humans. But rodents take it to a bit of an extreme.

Rats and mice, at birth, are so underdeveloped that not only do they have no fur, their eyes are actually sealed under their skin. For comparison, humans' eyes have the ability to fully open at around 28 weeks of pregnancy. Rats are also born with their ear canals sealed shut. Their sight and hearing are therefore very rudimentary and dull, but their sense of touch is certainly there! Any kind of stimulation or pressure on their skin will cause pinkies to squeak instinctively, in a process known as "nociception".

There are a few theoretical advantages to being born so... fetal. Because the pinkies are so tiny, birth is very easy for a mother rat. Each pinkie only takes about five minutes to exit the birth canal. As a prey species with little in the way of defense, you don't want to be stuck in a vulnerable position for too long, so being able to give birth to all your babies in an hour or two is a pretty good deal. The small size also enables big litters, which is another handy thing for a small prey species, where your offspring tend to live fast and die young. Compare this to a whale or an elephant, which almost always has one well-developed baby that grows very slowly. In general, animals that move in herds will tend to have babies that can walk along with the herd, and nesting or denning animals will tend to have altricial babies, although there are exceptions.

In addition, altriciality means a pregnant rat's body can resorb the babies if things don't seem to be going well (not much food, stressful conditions), and try again later!

A nifty thing about pinkies is they don't feel pain. Earlier, I mentioned "nociception". So, let's imagine a scenario in which you burn your hand on a hot plate. Nociception is the thing that makes you jerk your hand away. Pain is the thing that makes you wince and go, "OUCH!". The neural development of pinkies, up to about 7-12 days of age, is stunted enough that it's considered highly unlikely that they experience pain. They will squeak and wiggle instinctively to avoid dangerous stimuli and to catch their mother's attention, but the pathways that would produce the subjective and very unpleasant experience of pain just aren't formed yet.

Kind of a nice bonus for a mammal, when you spend your first few moments of life being squeezed through a little tube!

From a rat breeder's perspective, what's really cool about pinkies is you can already tell a lot of things about what the rat will look like when it grows up. If you click on the image at the top of this post, you may notice that some of the pinkies have big, dark eyes, and some seem to have just... nothing. The ones with the dark eyes will appear, as adults, to have either black or very dark red eyes, while the ones with an apparent absence will grow up to have pink eyes! The pink doesn't show because the skin is about the same value and colour.

You can also tell, from their tiny sprouting whiskers, what type of coat the rat will have. If the whiskers are straight, the baby will have a typical coat of smooth, straight fur. If they're quite curly and short, the baby may be hairless, or it may be a "rex" with curly fur. If they are wavy and blown about, the baby is likely "velveteen", a very soft, slightly curled type of fur! There are a few others, but these are the most common and most easily-identified types.

Hopefully, you've by now learned something new about the amazing and honourable pinkie!

To close off this post, I'd like to share a video of a pinkie, because they are just so cool to watch:

""

P.S.: If you're wondering what they feel like to hold, picture a 5-gram, slightly deflated grape.
 
Last edited:

Bug

👉😎👉
Moderator
Tech Team
🌱Featurer
🎇Contributor
Artist
Screenshotter
Team Delta
Pokédex No.
1
Caught
May 13, 2019
Messages
636
Location
in a pile of bugs
Nature
Rash
Pronouns
he/him
Pokémon Type
Bug, Cute
Pokédex Entry
oh fuck oh shit my dots...............................................................................................................................
Pinkies are SO cute. I see a lot of hamster pinkies more than anything, and they're pretty much the same, but like a smaller jellybean. There is nothing quite like lifting a hamster house to find a little cluster of pink, wiggly babies.

So, you talked a bit about feeders, so I have to ask: do you sell pinkies as well?
 

starmouse

All in service of some implacable "just cause".
Artist
Screenshotter
Team Delta
Pokédex No.
200
Caught
Jun 30, 2019
Messages
109
Nature
Impish
Pronouns
she/her
Pokémon Type
Water, Fairy
Pokédex Entry
This Pokémon is said to be scared of its own shadow. It can often be found sitting in the rain.
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #9
Pinkies are SO cute. I see a lot of hamster pinkies more than anything, and they're pretty much the same, but like a smaller jellybean. There is nothing quite like lifting a hamster house to find a little cluster of pink, wiggly babies.
They are adorable. One of my favourite things is when I go into the rat room and hear those little new pinkie squeaks. They get so darn excited when their mother even comes anywhere near them, like "milk?!? Malk?!!!"
I guess hamster pinkies would have stubby tails? I'm going to Google them now!

So, you talked a bit about feeders, so I have to ask: do you sell pinkies as well?
Feeder talk: I do. In cases of large litters, I will often euthanize some pinkies within the first few days so the mother can provide more individual attention (and milk!) to each baby. Pretty much any pinkies I euthanize are sold, although I will sometimes feed one to my snake in between full-sized meals.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bug

Obelisk

D O G
Writer
Team Omega
Pokédex No.
155
Caught
Jun 30, 2019
Messages
135
Nature
Quirky
Pronouns
He/Him
Pokémon Type
Electric
Pokédex Entry
Eccentric 'locker obsessed with Magikarp.
Is there any criteria as to which pinkies you euthanize?

Rat breeding sounds really interesting and, tbh, I'm really curious...How often do you get the odd bad rat in a litter of good ones? i.e. bad behavior or unfortunately cursed with poor health. I apologize if that question comes off insensitive or rude.
 

starmouse

All in service of some implacable "just cause".
Artist
Screenshotter
Team Delta
Pokédex No.
200
Caught
Jun 30, 2019
Messages
109
Nature
Impish
Pronouns
she/her
Pokémon Type
Water, Fairy
Pokédex Entry
This Pokémon is said to be scared of its own shadow. It can often be found sitting in the rain.
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #11
Is there any criteria as to which pinkies you euthanize?
Euthanasia talk: Usually I will wait a couple days to see how they are developing and euth any that are either quite small (can be a sign of failure to thrive) or have physical traits I'm not looking for, like sex or fur type. Physical traits as a criteria aren't usually my first priority at all, but with pinkies, you can't tell other factors like temperament, so if I need to euth some anyway that's how I do it.
Rat breeding sounds really interesting and, tbh, I'm really curious...How often do you get the odd bad rat in a litter of good ones? i.e. bad behavior or unfortunately cursed with poor health. I apologize if that question comes off insensitive or rude.
Not insensitive or rude at all, don't worry!

So for me personally, I'm starting with less than great rats, so it's more common for me to have a litter of mainly skittish rats with one or two better ones (which get held back for breeding). I have seen other breeders share video of litters that are mostly really confident and sweet, with one rat that is aggressive, defensive, and even kinda scary. So bad apples happen.

For health, you can get a pinkie that has problems as a direct result of the birth or that aren't genetic, so aren't distributed among the litter. One example is hydrocephalus, a condition where the head swells up with water--sometimes hereditary but sometimes just bad luck.
When they are adults, there tend to be those that are more susceptible to respiratory problems and those that are less, but that's usually more of a gradient of severity than a "one bad apple" situation. Many health parameters are complex and polygenic, so for these it's more a matter of selecting for the healthiest rats so they will trend that way over time.
 

MouseWithADinosaurTail

Luck will travel, but that's why I've got feet
Artist
Writer
Team Omega
Pokédex No.
47
Caught
Jun 15, 2019
Messages
762
Location
Paniola Ranch
Nature
Quirky
Pronouns
She/Her
Pokémon Type
Fairy, Flying
Pokédex Entry
Though she often appears sweet and polite, the smell of wrong opinions may cause this pokemon to latch bite.
What an interesting entry about pinkies! It was fun reading some more about them since I've kept rodents but never bred them or had any babies. I think pinkies are sooooooooooooooo cute! But the absolute cutest stage is when they get their fur, but their eyes haven't opened yet. That's the CUTEST CUTEST CUTEST!

So, question! You breed rats for food, but apparently you breed rats for good coats, health, and temperaments, too? :O Do you breed rats to show or for pets as well? If not, how come you bother breeding the rats to have good qualities since they're going to be feeders?
 

starmouse

All in service of some implacable "just cause".
Artist
Screenshotter
Team Delta
Pokédex No.
200
Caught
Jun 30, 2019
Messages
109
Nature
Impish
Pronouns
she/her
Pokémon Type
Water, Fairy
Pokédex Entry
This Pokémon is said to be scared of its own shadow. It can often be found sitting in the rain.
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #13
@MouseWithADinosaurTail
Glad you liked it!
That is a VERY CUTE stage of rodent. My personal favourite is the first few days after their eyes open and they're in their fluffiest baby coats and they squint and blink at everything because the world is so bright!

My main goal is actually pets! A lot of rodent breeders are "dual purpose", that is to say, they breed for food, pets, and sometimes show. But many feeder-only breeders also aim for good temperament, because it makes handling of the animals safer and easier. And they breed for good health, because healthy feeders means healthy snakes (or ferrets/cats/lizards/what-have-you).
 

starmouse

All in service of some implacable "just cause".
Artist
Screenshotter
Team Delta
Pokédex No.
200
Caught
Jun 30, 2019
Messages
109
Nature
Impish
Pronouns
she/her
Pokémon Type
Water, Fairy
Pokédex Entry
This Pokémon is said to be scared of its own shadow. It can often be found sitting in the rain.
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #14
For today's post, we're taking a look into the world of zoonotic illness.

This post is about a little event that rocked American rat breeders in 2017.

This is about Seoul virus.

In December 2016, a human patient in Wisconsin was hospitalized with fever, kidney damage, and leukopenia. This patient also happened to have a large rattery. Because of the particular symptoms and the patient's proximity to rodents, they were tested for hantavirus, a family of zoonotic viruses that are carried primarily by wild mice... but also by wild rats.

Key word "wild".

This was the first time a connection had been drawn between domesticated rats in North America, and hantavirus infection. The CDC (Centre for Disease Control) quickly launched an investigation and reached out to other ratteries for testing. Out of 183 people in the US and Canada, 13.1% tested positive for Seoul antibodies. A disease which had never before been detected in North American domestic rats had apparently now spread to the point where it was infecting over one in ten rat breeders. Nobody knew exactly where it had come from, and how it had crossed over from wild to domestic rats, but it was here.

Now, I didn't start breeding until 2018, so I was never directly in the throes of the Seoul virus outbreak, but I've heard enough war stories to know that the seriousness of the situation can't be overstated. This virus was enough of a scare to the CDC that numerous ratteries were forced to shut down based on having just one rat turn up positive for Seoul. It didn't matter if every other rat tested negative -- they all had to be euthanized. (The reaction in Canada was decidedly more temperate, and our health guys pretty much just said "be careful and wash your hands".)

Seoul is a particularly nasty thing for a rat colony because it is absolutely insidious. It causes no apparent effects in rats themselves whatsoever, so it's impossible to detect without a blood test. It never "runs its course" like most viruses do, but persists in its main host forever, like HIV. And worst of all, it can have severe effects when it crosses over to humans. While it can often be asymptomatic, or appear as a mild flu, it can potentially be deadly -- especially in those with weakened immune systems.

The rat breeding community was pretty well devastated. Many breeders went "underground" to avoid a colony wipe. Others gave up on breeding after losing many rats and lines they had been working on for years. Others took a break after losing their colony, but were able to restart with new rats later. Others were lucky to test 100% negative.

But regardless of the outcome for each individual breeder, things were changed forever for the breeder community as a whole. Where rats were once exchanged between ratteries freely, with nothing more than a standard quarantine period, many people now switched to a "closed-door" system in which absolutely no new rats entered the rattery unless they had been blood tested with absolute certainty. Paranoia became the norm. Someone's rats may have been tested in the past -- but how could one be sure that they were still clean, or that the breeder was being honest with their results? Years later, the shadow of Seoul virus still hangs over the community.

On a more personal note, I made the decision to test my rats for Seoul this year.

While I'm not concerned about the danger to myself (after all, all domestic animals carry a risk, from cat scratch fever to lyme disease), I plan to adopt out to other people, and, well -- I would feel pretty darn bad if something happened.

The way this works, on a practical level, is you get a set of small strips, each containing an absorbent square designed to hold blood. You fill each square with blood from a rat, and you ship the strips off to a testing centre that analyzes it for hantavirus. In my case, I did the shipping through a vet, but took the blood myself.

So, taking blood from a rat is super not a fun thing. There are a couple of different methods, but the least stressful seemed to me to be the "nail clip" method, which is where you trim a nail too short past the quick. Basically, I would wrap a rat in a towel (rabbit owners may be familiar with the similar "bunny burrito" trick) with its head tucked into my stomach, gently pull a back foot out with my fingers, and then snip. I would then dab the toe onto the test strip with the rat's name written on it for identification. The rats were not a fan of this, and I felt pretty bad, but I gave them all banana bread after and they seemed to forget about it really quickly once they had 'NANABRED.


Once this was done for all my adults and a couple of babbies, I brought the samples back to my vet and dropped them off.

And... just a few days ago, I got some fantastic news!

None of my rats have Seoul!

This means I can finally think about adopting out to the public, exchanging rats with other breeders, and breeding new litters. I've been waiting for this day for a while now, and I'm so excited.

This also means you can expect rat baby posts sometime in the next few months!
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Bug

MouseWithADinosaurTail

Luck will travel, but that's why I've got feet
Artist
Writer
Team Omega
Pokédex No.
47
Caught
Jun 15, 2019
Messages
762
Location
Paniola Ranch
Nature
Quirky
Pronouns
She/Her
Pokémon Type
Fairy, Flying
Pokédex Entry
Though she often appears sweet and polite, the smell of wrong opinions may cause this pokemon to latch bite.
Ah, it makes me sad to hear about those poor rats. ;;;o;;; I understand the decision making, but it's terribly sad nonetheless. But it's wonderful news that your babies are just fine!!!! Getting to make your rattery public must be terribly exciting! :D
 

starmouse

All in service of some implacable "just cause".
Artist
Screenshotter
Team Delta
Pokédex No.
200
Caught
Jun 30, 2019
Messages
109
Nature
Impish
Pronouns
she/her
Pokémon Type
Water, Fairy
Pokédex Entry
This Pokémon is said to be scared of its own shadow. It can often be found sitting in the rain.
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #16
Yeah, it was not a fun time ; _ ; I never like making animals go through medical stuff, because I know I can rationalize to myself that I'm getting a shot for a reason or drinking this gross medicine for a reason, but an animal can only take each experience at face value, like "ick" or "ow".

But they were acting normal, happily eating treats and licking my hands after, so they didn't seem to have any lasting stress.
 

Bowser's Family Vacation

Johto League Champion
Writer
Team Delta
Pokédex No.
301
Caught
Jul 1, 2019
Messages
623
Nature
Rash
Pronouns
She/her
Pokémon Type
Dragon, Cool
Pokédex Entry
"Am I Mario's babysitter? Are you going to call me every time that guy blows his nose, or what?"
Wow, that must have been a terrible time to be a rat breeder. Even if you bounced back, I'm sure public fear persists, and the general public already has enough unfounded fears about rats...

I'm glad your testing went well, though! It's amazing how quickly animals bounce back with the power of treats. :)
 

starmouse

All in service of some implacable "just cause".
Artist
Screenshotter
Team Delta
Pokédex No.
200
Caught
Jun 30, 2019
Messages
109
Nature
Impish
Pronouns
she/her
Pokémon Type
Water, Fairy
Pokédex Entry
This Pokémon is said to be scared of its own shadow. It can often be found sitting in the rain.
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #18
Wow, that must have been a terrible time to be a rat breeder. Even if you bounced back, I'm sure public fear persists, and the general public already has enough unfounded fears about rats...
Oh, definitely. Of course the last thing a rat enthusiast wants is bad publicity! Never mind that cats (and I love cats) carry so many zoonotic diseases they have an entire Wikipedia article dedicated to them, and canine rabies kills tens of thousands of people worldwide each year.

As hantaviruses go, Seoul is really one of the least scary, too.

I'm glad your testing went well, though! It's amazing how quickly animals bounce back with the power of treats. :)
Isn't it? There's nothing like a good snack :)
 

Bug

👉😎👉
Moderator
Tech Team
🌱Featurer
🎇Contributor
Artist
Screenshotter
Team Delta
Pokédex No.
1
Caught
May 13, 2019
Messages
636
Location
in a pile of bugs
Nature
Rash
Pronouns
he/him
Pokémon Type
Bug, Cute
Pokédex Entry
oh fuck oh shit my dots...............................................................................................................................
It's nice to finally have some context behind the strict policies we have at my work about rat bites. I'm not looking forward to the inevitable doctor visit I'll have to take down the line when I'm inevitably bitten, but having an idea of the scope that this virus had, I can understand why a company wouldn't be taking risks when they're buying from large suppliers.

I'm very excited to see some baby ratties! I had no idea about the banana bread as a treat, that is SO cute.
 

starmouse

All in service of some implacable "just cause".
Artist
Screenshotter
Team Delta
Pokédex No.
200
Caught
Jun 30, 2019
Messages
109
Nature
Impish
Pronouns
she/her
Pokémon Type
Water, Fairy
Pokédex Entry
This Pokémon is said to be scared of its own shadow. It can often be found sitting in the rain.
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #20
It's nice to finally have some context behind the strict policies we have at my work about rat bites. I'm not looking forward to the inevitable doctor visit I'll have to take down the line when I'm inevitably bitten, but having an idea of the scope that this virus had, I can understand why a company wouldn't be taking risks when they're buying from large suppliers.
In the case of bites, they're probably worried about rat bite fever, which is basically similar to cat scratch fever, but with a different bacteria. About 10% of bites result in RBF (one great reason to breed rats that don't bite.)

I'm very excited to see some baby ratties! I had no idea about the banana bread as a treat, that is SO cute.
Oh yes! They love pretty much anything that's not their normal food as a treat haha. One treat I love to give them is a hard boiled egg still in the shell, because they get really excited trying to get it open.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Top